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The cinema of Nigeria , often referred to informally as Nollywood , consists of films produced in Nigeria; its history dates back to as early as the late 19th century and into the colonial era in the early 20th century. The history and development of the Nigerian motion picture industry is sometimes generally classified in four main eras: the Colonial era , Golden Age , Video film era and the emerging New Nigerian cinema. Film as a medium first arrived to Nigeria in the late 19th century, in the form of peephole viewing of motion picture devices. The first film entirely copyrighted to the Nigerian Film unit is Fincho by Sam Zebba; which is also the first Nigerian film to be shot in colour. After Nigeria's independence in , the cinema business rapidly expanded, with new cinema houses being established. After the decline of the Golden era, Nigerian film industry experienced a second major boom in the s, supposedly marked by the release of the direct-to-video film Living in Bondage ; the industry peaked in the mid s to become the second largest film industry in the world in terms of the number of annual film productions, placing it ahead of the United States and behind only India. The boom also led to backlash against Nigerian films in several countries, bordering on theories such as the "Nigerialization of Africa". Since mids, during the decline of the video-film era, the Nigerian cinema has undergone some restructuring to promote quality in output and professionalism in the industry, with The Figurine widely regarded as marking the major turn around of contemporary Nigerian cinema. There has since been a resurgence in cinema establishments, and a steady return of the cinema culture in Nigeria. The history of cinema in Nigeria dates back to as early as the history of film itself; notably in the late 19th century, with the use of peephole viewing of motion picture devices. Although Mr Balboa later closed his exhibition in Lagos, while he continued showing films in other West African countries, the success of his exhibition led to a European merchant, Stanley Jones, to begin showing films in the same Glover Memorial Hall, starting from November This brought about the influx of more European film exhibitors to Nigeria. Colonial filmmakers started producing films for local audiences within Nigeria since the s, mostly employing the mobile cinema as a means of exhibition; [28] the earliest feature film made in Nigeria is 's Palaver produced by Geoffrey Barkas. The film was also the first film ever to feature Nigerian actors in a speaking role. The film was shot amongst the Sura and Angas people of the present day Bauchi and Plateau States in Northern Nigeria , and narrates the rivalry between a British District Officer and a tin miner which leads to a war. Martins also featured in other notable films including The Man from Morocco , Men of Two Worlds and so on, and this established Martins as one of the recognized Nigerian actors of his time. By this time, cinema had become popular in Lagos with crowds of young and old people usually waiting at the doors of theatre halls. Religion also aided in the expansion of cinema culture as the Christian missionaries used cinemas for religious propaganda. As cinemas became a common feature of the social life in the then emerging city of Lagos , the late s through s marked the beginning of the establishment of big commercial cinema houses with branches in strategic parts of the country. Khalil, a member of the Syrian community in Lagos. In , the colonial government set up a Board of Censorship to handle matters relating to the establishment and operations of cinema houses in the colony. Motion picture entertainment was as a result complemented by the Yoruba travel theatre groups, which emerged in the s through s; One of the most prominent were the Agbegijo and Alarinjo theatre groups, which featured theatre actors such as Duro Ladipo, Ishola Ogunmola, Lere Paimo, Oyin Adejobi, amongst others. In through , the state of affairs changed a bit, with more Nigerian contents being exhibited in cinemas; [15] with a purported drive to "Africanize" film production, [28] the Nigerian Film Unit was established in order to decentralize colonial film production. The Colonial Film Unit , throughout the decade, exhibited health and educational films to local audiences through its mobile cinema vans. It also produced newsreels and short documentaries, depicting celebrations and colonial achievements to domestic and overseas audiences. Towards the late s and into the s Nigerian productions in movie houses increased gradually, especially productions from Western Nigeria, owing to former theatre practitioners such as Hubert Ogunde , Ola Balogun , Moses Olaiya , Jab Adu, Isola Ogunsola, Ladi Ladebo , Sanya Dosumu and Sadiq Balewa amongst others, transitioning into the big screen. In , concerned about the influx of foreign culture into Nigeria, the Indigenization Decree was issued by the then head of state Yakubu Gowon ; which demands the transfer of ownership of about a total of film theatres in the country from their foreign owners to Nigerians. Also, more Nigerians started playing active roles in cinema establishment as a result of this policy. This transfer also resulted in the emergence of Nigerian playwrights, screenwriters and film producers; popular literature and theatre works were adapted into motion pictures. The presence of foreign investments led to the erection of several cinema complexes. The theatre was incorporated with two cinemas, each having a capacity of over people. Television broadcasting in Nigeria began in the s and received much government support in its early years. By the mids every state had its own broadcasting station. Law limited foreign content on television, so producers in Lagos began televising local popular theatre productions. Many of these were circulated on video as well, and a small-scale informal video movie trade developed. The gradual decline of the Golden era of Nigerian cinema has been attributed to several factors, including the reduction in the value of Naira , lack of finance and marketing support, lack of standard film studios and production equipment, frequent Government structural adjustment programmes due to military dictatorships, as well as inexperience on the part of practitioners. The drastic decline in cinema culture resulted in some of the existing cinema houses being acquired by religious bodies and turned to churches; others were simply just closed down. In the early s, only a few of the once vibrant cinema houses were still in operation, and all had collapsed before The emergence of the video film market in Nigeria is traced back to the s when television productions thrived. Jimi Odumosu's Evil Encounter , a horror film released directly on television, was the first production to be a pointer to how lucrative making film directly on video can be. The film was extensively promoted before being aired on the television, and as a result, had streets flooded in the following morning with video copies of the recorded broadcast. It was reported that the film became an instant hit at Alaba market , a commercial district which later became the hub of video distribution in this period and also eventually became the hub of piracy in Nigeria. Since Evil Encounter , it became common, especially in Southern Nigerian cities to see video copies of recorded television programmes traded on the streets. This method was adopted and built on by producers and distributors at Alaba Market to reinvent the film industry, since the Nigerian cinema culture was facing a major decline. The film was also screened at the few available theatres at the time. Nnebue had an excess number of imported video cassettes which he then used to shoot his first film on a Video camera. As of , at least four to five films were produced every day in Nigeria. Nigeria movies now already dominate television screens across the African continent and by extension, the diaspora. According to the Filmmakers Cooperative of Nigeria , every film in Nigeria had a potential audience of 15 million people in Nigeria and about 5 million outside Nigeria. In no time, the industry became the third largest producer of films in the world. The film industry regardless became a major employer in Nigeria. At the peak of the video era at around , the industry had become the second largest producer of films, [41] releasing approximately video films monthly. However at this point, the Nigerian film industry had practically degenerated into a "visionless" industry, with the invasion of several people who do not know a thing about filmmaking, and piracy was at its peak. The decline of the Home video era has been attributed to several factors, such as the refusal of the Government to provide support and funding, the lack of a formal and effective indigenous film distribution infrastructure and the increase in the cost of production in Nigeria. This is an emerging phase in Nigerian cinema, in which there became a major shift in the method of film production, from the video format, back to the cinema method, which constituted the films produced in the Golden era. Few years into the 21st century, Nigeria began to experience the growth of cinemas, which was initially structured for the middle and upper class. The Silverbird Group is the first company to launch a series of modern Cinema houses across major cities in Nigeria, mostly situated in affluent areas and districts. The Silverbird Galleria is a large shopping mall, with an upscale cinema facility and various outlets where mercantile activities take place. This provides more reasons to visit the place beyond just watching films, but more of a social activity and a modified sort of entertainment beyond film watching. This trend has given another probable explanation as to the demise of the Nigerian cinema culture in the s, which might have been as a result of the unfashionable appearance of most cinemas of the Golden era. Silverbird cinemas upon establishment started screening Nigerian films with high production quality, as a result discouraging poor film production. The first New wave film to be shown at a cinema was the Yoruba-language film Irapada by Kunle Afolayan , which was screened at the Silverbird Galleria in Lagos. The Silverbird experiment became very successful, and as a result, the group launched few more cinema branches in Lagos and other cities in the country. Not long after the establishment of Silverbird cinemas, Genesis Deluxe Cinemas and Ozone Cinemas were also launched creating a competition in the cinema business. Much later, in the s, Filmhouse Cinemas also came into the picture, leading to the availability of more cinemas in the country, especially outside the affluent neighbourhoods. Several grants have been launched by the Nigerian Government, in order to support quality content in Nigerian films. This grant, although dubbed as a spin-off of "Project Nollywood", was for the entire Nigerian Creative Arts and Entertainment sector. The vision of the grant for the film industry however is to help more Nigerian filmmakers in training, funding, and also help in creating necessary infrastructure for the industry. The popular thriller film The Figurine is generally considered the game changer, which heightened the media attention towards " New Nigerian Cinema " revolution. It contributed about 1. These films' production periods take months and even span into years, a far cry from the films in video format which are usually shot in a matter of days or weeks. Other notable improvements in the New Nollywood include: more subtle performances from actors; different from the overt melodrama which constituted the video era, more practical, more logical and generally better stories. Around year through , Nigerian filmmaker Frank Rajah Arase signed a contract with a Ghanaian production company, Venus Films , which involved helping to introduce Ghanaian actors into mainstream Nollywood. Several other producers as a result started shooting in cities like Accra , Ghana , channeling the savings into investing in better equipment, many of them trying to get their films onto the big screen. In , Nigerian Entertainment Today revealed that Ghanaian actors had 60 percent of the total market share in the year. A survey carried out by the Newspaper showed that out of films featured on Nollytuned. It was also reported that there are high demands for Ghanaian acts in video stores. Sam Onanuga, a Nigerian script writer blames the trend on the reluctance of the established Nigerian acts to partake in more films on Video. This development sparked media attention; mostly concerns that Ghanaians were taking over jobs meant for Nigerians. For us it is a good development. The increased collaboration between Nigeria and Ghana from the mid s led to the resurgence of Ghana's film industry. However, many Ghanaian productions are copyrighted to Nollywood and distributed by Nigerian marketers due to Nigeria's bigger market. Nigerian filmmakers usually feature Ghanaian actors in Nigerian movies as well and that has led to the popularity of Ghanaian actors almost like their Nigerian counterparts. Nigerian actors have also starred in some Ghanaian productions, in order for the film to capture wider audience. As a result of these collaborations, Western viewers often confuse Ghanaian movies with Nigerian films and count their sales as one; however, they are two independent industries that sometimes share the colloquial " Nollywood ". In , Unesco rated Nollywood as the second-biggest film industry in the world after Indian cinema in terms of output. Since the s, Nigerian movies started to dominate television screens across the African continent and by extension, the diaspora. This overwhelming popularity has also led to backlash against Nigerian films in several countries; For instance, there have been reported cases of shops selling Nigerian films being raided by the police in Ghana ; according to them, "they are struggling not to be colonized by Nigerian movies". He stated that there seems to be a "Nigerianization" of Africa, worrying that the whole continent has come to "snap its fingers the Nigerian way". The Nigerian film industry has a strong following in the African diaspora community in Europe , especially in the United Kingdom. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Nigerian film industry. Main article: Filmmaking in Colonial Nigeria. Main article: Golden Age of Nigerian cinema. Main article: Video film era. Main article: New Nigerian Cinema. Retrieved Archived from the original on 5 November Retrieved 5 November Archived from the original on 4 May Retrieved 13 February National Bureau of Statistics. May Lagos, Nigeria: Business Day. Retrieved 21 February Lagos , Nigeria : National Mirror. Archived from the original on 4 January Retrieved 2 January Central Connecticut State University. Africa Update Vol. XI, Issue 2. Retrieved 16 July Modern Ghana. Retrieved 13 April Historical Research Letter. ISSN Shadow and Act. Archived from the original on 29 May Colonial Film. Goethe Institute. Retrieved 24 August Archived from the original on 6 September Retrieved 15 October African Film Festival Inc. New York. Retrieved 7 April United Nations. The Economist. Retrieved 20 February Retrieved 12 February Nollywood Journal. Archived from the original on Nigeria Village Square. Retrieved 20 March Business Day Newspaper. Business Day Online. Archived from the original on 31 December Retrieved 1 November June Jorind Retrieved 18 February Retrieved 29 March Retrieved from www. National Pilot Newspaper. National Pilot. Retrieved 17 February E Magazine. New York Times. Archived from the original on 16 February This Day Live. Archived from the original on 31 October Retrieved 14 February Aljazeera America. The New York Times. Retrieved 24 March Covenant University. Archived from the original on 14 May The Guardian Newspaper. Finding Nollywood. Archived from the original on 2 April Retrieved 11 March Archived from the original on 12 March Huhu Online. Archived from the original on 3 September Manufacturing Today. Archived from the original on 22 July Retrieved 19 March Archived from the original on 28 June Nigerian Entertainment Today. Archived from the original on 29 April Retrieved 6 May The Nation Newspaper. The Nation Online. The Guardian. Retrieved 12 April Sowetan Live. Archived from the original on 27 October The Nation NG. Retrieved 16 March Indie Wire. Archived from the original on 14 September Research Gate. Ehizoya Films. Ehizoya Golden Entertainment. Retrieved 9 July The Nation. Retrieved 16 February Vanguard Newspaper. The Vanguard. Spy Ghana. Archived from the original on 30 March The Times. Retrieved 3 April Retrieved 28 March Open University. Total Facts about Nigeria. Retrieved 22 October Cinema of Nigeria. Actors Cinematographers Directors Producers Screenwriters. Africa International Film Festival. Box Office Cinema chains Film Studios. Nigeria articles. Kingdoms Empires. Communal conflicts in Nigeria Herder—farmer conflicts in Nigeria Islamist insurgency Niger Delta conflicts conflict. Outline Index. Cinema of Africa. States with limited recognition. Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic Somaliland. Dependencies and other territories. World cinema. National cinema. Algeria Egypt Libya Morocco Tunisia. Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Turkmenistan Uzbekistan. Australia Fiji New Zealand Samoa. Categories : Cinema of Nigeria Industry in Nigeria. Hidden categories: All articles with dead external links Articles with dead external links from July Articles with permanently dead external links Webarchive template wayback links Articles with dead external links from November Articles with short description Short description matches Wikidata All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from December Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Wikimedia Commons. FilmOne Distributions Part of a series on the. Nigerians History Languages Holidays Religion. Nigeria portal. Outline Index Category Portal. Detail Mojere Part 2 -Yoruba Nollywood Movie MP3 dapat kamu nikmati dengan cara klik link download dibawah dengan mudah tanpa adanya iklan yang mengganggu.. This is a free film to watch Will a relationship be worth fighting for when a father who is wary of his daughter's long courtship with a mystery man plots a happily ever plan Cast:- and An A-list actress in her prime is the best at her acting profession but her dress sense and personality doesn't appeal to some people who intends Morire Mojere are friends like sisters with similar characters. They lived for each other each passing day. Will these traits last long when an Still in the euphoria of their marriage, a newly married lady reconnects and accommodates her old friend. 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